Home Hello James Corden failed to impress as Tony Awards host

James Corden failed to impress as Tony Awards host



Although I’m happy Bryan Cranston won the Best Actor Tony for “Network,” I dearly loved Jeff Daniels in “Mockingbird,” and he told me: “The show’s so special. I can feel the tension in the audience. It’s 1,400 people not moving.”

On Monday, someone had just called me to complain Tonys host James Corden was better before he gurgled in a car. Back rolling around on 2012’s Broadway stage in “One Man, Two Guvnors,” he excelled. Now his body’s fatter, ego’s bigger and magic’s thinner. The Tonys’ splashy opening? Big rehearsal. Small twinkle.

As that call about Corden came in, the helicopter crash came on. Its site was precisely where I was then headed. Award-winning set designer David Rockwell was organizing his Citymeals on Wheels that night at that very neighborhood, Rock Center. I told him I’d be there — and then the whole world turned.

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3. Deep water viewing

Oceanographer Jacques Cousteau’s grandchildren host Science Channel’s “Legends of the Deep.” Fabien’s 51. Age 4, he jumped into a pool in California. “I’ve explored deep water all my life.”

OK, so how does one do this?

“Get permission, learn things, know your subject before investigating UFO sightings, shipwrecks, sea monsters. An old Greek diver recalls. Check clues, story origins. Read mysteries like of the ancient wreck in Cyprus, Nova Scotia, another that might’ve trafficked arms to the Palestine Liberation Organization.

“Even modern vessels sink. Scuba divers know one from 1981, transporting cargo in the Netherlands and modern by shipwreck standards. Got stuck, difficulties counterbalancing, couldn’t stabilize and sunk.

“Diving into deep waters, 160 feet down, dark, you can lose a foothold. Dangerous to penetrate a cargo hold lying on its side or still hanging on ceilings. Debris is treacherous. You squeeze through rusty metal, broken pieces.

“There’s a dive master. Main team, my sister Céline and I, take six on each dive. Plus masks for communication, equipment, backpacks, air supply, lights, cameras. We’re conscious of time. That’s limited because it takes long to get there when you’re squeezing through with a tank on your back. It’s never easy.

“We’re connected to a special gas mix. High percentage oxygen and nitrogen. Dive time’s measured by the special watch and computer screen on your wrist. Always go in with a buddy in case you somehow get hung up in the ship itself. And when we come up there’s decompression.”

Watch it on Sunday, 9 p.m., on a nice dry couch.

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