Stunning photos show London being rebuilt five years after the Blitz flattened the capital

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STUNNING retro pictures show London being rebuilt just five years after it was flattened by the Blitz of World War Two.

The incredible images show gaping cellars and foundations of many blitzed sites which had not yet been cleared away.

 The maze of caves and hideouts form an exciting playground for London children who have no other recreation spaces following WWII

Mediadrumimages / TopFoto

The maze of caves and hideouts form an exciting playground for London children who have no other recreation spaces following WWII
 Churches were restored with the help of stone salvaged from the rubble of other churches. Here the salvaged stone is being carried by two workmen and will be loaded onto a lorry

Mediadrumimages / TopFoto

Churches were restored with the help of stone salvaged from the rubble of other churches. Here the salvaged stone is being carried by two workmen and will be loaded onto a lorry

Other pictures show beautiful churches that were being restored with the help of stone salvaged from the rubble.

Meanwhile, a refreshing flower garden was also transformed from the debris which was left on the ground.

Another striking shot shows a group of children playing in the foundations of a demolished building.

CRICKET MATCH

And a group of workers can be seen taking part in an unconventional cricket match in the cellar of a bombed out building during lunchtime.

A photographer also captured the moment workmen salvaged rubble of a blitzed church masonry in the shadow of St Paul’s Cathedral.

The remarkable photographs offer an insight into just how long the rebuilding process took with these images shot in London in 1950, five years after the end of World War Two.

HOUSES DESTROYED

The Blitz was a German bombing campaign against Britain in 1940 and 1941, during the Second World War.

The term was first used by the British press and is the German word for “lightning”.

During the Blitz 32,000 civilians were killed and 87,000 were seriously injured and two million houses – of which 60 per cent were in London – were destroyed.

In one six-month period, 750,000 tons of bombsite rubble from London was transported by railway on 1,700 freight trains to make runways on Bomber Command airfields in East Anglia.

Bombsite rubble from Birmingham was used to make runways on US Air Force bases in Kent and Essex in South East England.

Many sites of bombed buildings, when cleared of rubble, were cultivated to grow vegetables to ease wartime food shortages and were known as victory gardens.

 In the shadow of St Paul's Cathedral, workmen are busy salvaging from the rubble of a blitzed church masonry which can be used elsewhere

Mediadrumimages / TopFoto

In the shadow of St Paul’s Cathedral, workmen are busy salvaging from the rubble of a blitzed church masonry which can be used elsewhere
 Workmen used the rubble to help rebuild churches and other buildings in the city - just yards from St Paul's

Mediadrumimages / TopFoto

Workmen used the rubble to help rebuild churches and other buildings in the city – just yards from St Paul’s
 City business men remove their black jackets at lunchtime for an unconventional 30 minute cricket match on the cellar floor of a bombed building

Mediadrumimages / TopFoto

City business men remove their black jackets at lunchtime for an unconventional 30 minute cricket match on the cellar floor of a bombed building
 Often amongst the rubble and the torn, empty houses, is a spectacular garden

Mediadrumimages / TopFoto

Often amongst the rubble and the torn, empty houses, is a spectacular garden
 A group of dedicated workmen were seen moving salvaged rubble onto the back of a lorry so the restoration project could continue

Mediadrumimages / TopFoto

A group of dedicated workmen were seen moving salvaged rubble onto the back of a lorry so the restoration project could continue
 A stone mason is busy at work with his hand tools as a crowd gathers to watch

Mediadrumimages / TopFoto

A stone mason is busy at work with his hand tools as a crowd gathers to watch
 Men worked tirelessly to lift stone and rubble to help rebuild churches which had been knocked down

Mediadrumimages / TopFoto

Men worked tirelessly to lift stone and rubble to help rebuild churches which had been knocked down
 On Ludgate Hill, beneath St Paul's Cathedral, a firm of landscape gardeners turned a bomb site into a charming garden, with paved walks, goldfish streams, flower beds and shrubs

Mediadrumimages / TopFoto

On Ludgate Hill, beneath St Paul’s Cathedral, a firm of landscape gardeners turned a bomb site into a charming garden, with paved walks, goldfish streams, flower beds and shrubs
 Two women having a rest beside bomb damaged ruins of demolished buildings

Mediadrumimages / TopFoto

Two women having a rest beside bomb damaged ruins of demolished buildings
 The longest advertisement hoarding in London stands on a bombed site near Piccadilly Circus, with a little flower garden at its foot

Mediadrumimages / TopFoto

The longest advertisement hoarding in London stands on a bombed site near Piccadilly Circus, with a little flower garden at its foot
 An advertisement where a bomb damaged building once stood

Mediadrumimages / TopFoto

An advertisement where a bomb damaged building once stood


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