Tutankhamun’s tomb reveals NEW curses and mysterious sticky dust as eerie 3,300-year-old burial chamber is re-explored

0
47

Our HELLONEWS mobile app has been released. Please click here to download. Don't miss our current news!


TUTANKAMUN’S tomb has revealed new curses and mysterious sticky dust after the eerie 3,300-year-old burial chamber was re-explored.

As conservators removed an old viewing platform to fit a new air filtration system, they found ancient writings, jinxing and calling for curses on others.

 The linen-wrapped mummy of the 18th dynasty Pharaoh Tutankhamun displayed in his climate-controlled glass case in his underground tomb

AFP or licensors

The linen-wrapped mummy of the 18th dynasty Pharaoh Tutankhamun displayed in his climate-controlled glass case in his underground tomb

Other scraps of ancient parchment were found asking for blessings from the boy king.

The discovery was made after a decade-long project between the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities and the Los Angeles-based Getty Conservation Institute.

Within the boy king’s colourful 1,182 square-foot chambers, one of the most enduring mysteries of the tomb were the acidic brown freckles spread across the wall paintings.

ACIDIC FRECKLES

National Geographic reported how the substance confounded scientists for almost a century after the tombs discovery in 1922.

A study of the spots revealed high concentrations of acids from fungi and bacteria, but even microscope imaging showed no remnants of the original organisms that created them.

Now conservators theorise that because Tut died unexpectedly, the preparation of his tomb was likely a rush job.

STICKY DUST

The fresh paint would have retained enough moisture for microbes to thrive in the tomb’s dark and warmth.

One of the stickiest problems in the tomb has been the constant presence of adhesive dust that slowly corroded the paintings on the walls.

Scientists now believe it is simple human perspiration that causes it, along with sands tramped in by the tombs 1,000 daily visitors.

Researchers have now installed a sophisticated air filtration and ventilation system to filter the corrupting substance.
The tombs were first discovered in 1922 by Howard Carter.

The new revelations follow the discovery of a 16th-century mummified monk which may help us understand why we suffer arthritis.

 The paintings on the boy king's tomb are covered in mysterious acid marks

AFP or licensors

The paintings on the boy king’s tomb are covered in mysterious acid marks
 The famous tomb underwent a nine-year conservation by a team of international specialists

AFP or licensors

The famous tomb underwent a nine-year conservation by a team of international specialists
 Pharaoh Tutankhamun was mummified at the end of his rule

AFP or licensors

Pharaoh Tutankhamun was mummified at the end of his rule
 A mysterious sticky dust threatens to corrode the magnificent paintings on the tombs walls

AFP or licensors

A mysterious sticky dust threatens to corrode the magnificent paintings on the tombs walls
 An image shows the pharaoh's feet

AFP or licensors

An image shows the pharaoh’s feet


We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368 . You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours.


 





Our HELLONEWS mobile app has been released. Please click here to download. Don't miss our current news!

Source link